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Other Artists

Water is life, and breath, and love. Olivia Martinez (Taos Pueblo) honors them all with this traditional wedding vase. Made of hand-coiled local micaceous clay, it arises out of a large round bowl nearly spherical in shape, with a gracefully angled ridge around its widest point that gives the impression of a lid. From the bowl […]

Olivia Martinez (Taos Pueblo) infuses this traditional micaceous wedding vase with motifs of unity and love. The vase is made in the old way, hand-coiled, lightly polished, and fired to a subtle sheen. The bowl is slightly sculpted, a barely-definable ridge accenting its widest point; each spout emerges gracefully from the bowl, one angled upward at […]

Frank Rain Leaf (Taos Pueblo) evokes both ancient and modern representation of person and place in this acrylic painting of a traditionally-dressed Pueblo flute player. This is one of Frank’s most iconic and popular images, one he has used as a model for smaller art media such as greeting cards. It’s an image of the […]

One of Taos Pueblo’s masters in the visual arts, Frank Rain Leaf, honors his people’s images and identity with pencil portraits of them in their finest traditional dress. Here, it’s a traditional Pueblo man wearing his finest regalia, evoked from pencil and paper in incredibly fine detail. This man wears his hair the old way, in […]

Frank Rain Leaf, one of Taos Pueblo’s master visual artists, pays tribute to the old ways with this pencil portrait of a Pueblo woman in her finest traditional dress. The detail is outstanding: In addition to capturing the bone structure and features for which his people are known, his portrayal of the smallest, finest points […]

Renowned Comanche artist Tim Saupitty created a matched pair of air-spray paintings in watercolor hues, images of a man and woman in full traditional dress. The male figure remains in Wings’s private collection; he has put the female figure on offer. Whether viewed as a dancer or a bride, she is wholly traditional, with beaded […]

Randy Roughface (Ponca) has cajoled this miniature horse into emerging from a block of white alabaster so translucent it looks like calcite. His abundant mane and tail flow freely; head lowered, he appears ready to spring into a gallop at any moment. He stands atop a thin point of Pilar slate. Length, from tip of tail […]

This coiled bracelet is one of the trademark traditional styles of mother/daughter team of Clarita and Vera Tenorio (Kewa Pueblo). After choosing more than 200 chip-style turquoise nuggets in varying shades of blue and green, lightly polished and drilled in the centers, they string them on a spiraled length of sterling silver wire; the wire’s own […]

Some 200 subtly-shaped free-form nuggets of blue and green turquoise are lightly polished, drilled, and and strung on a tense length of spiraled silver wire. Each end of the strand is capped by a single piece of drilled coral and a tiny sterling silver round bead. The flexible coil style fits nearly any wrist. By Clarita […]

This simple little necklace is one from Wings’s private collection, made years ago by one of the Pueblo’s children. Strung on simple fishing line, it features spiraled metal tube beads with a coppery glow. Half-way down the length of the necklace, they begin alternating with rough-polished chip beads of spiny oyster shell in purple and […]

The spirit bear wears a coat of winter white year-round. Here, he’s rendered by Jeremy Gomez (Taos Pueblo) in beautiful spiderweb alabaster, the color of snow delicately traced with lines of shimmery gold and dark brown. He takes the form of a medicine bear, holding on his back a bundle of feathers in colors mirroring […]

The medicine bear takes form this time as a ghost bear, a mystical being, hand-wrought from spiderweb alabaster by Jeremy Gomez (Taos Pueblo). In keeping with his medicine obligations, he carries the bundle on his back, made up of feathers that evoke the colors of his marbled body and a topped by a miniature Skystone […]

This mysteriously marbled spirit bear is hand-carved by Jeremy Gomez (Taos Pueblo) of gorgeous spiderweb alabaster. In keeping with his status as a medicine bear fetish, he holds a bundle on his back, one composed of delicate feathers and a tiny piece of turquoise. He stands firmly upon a red cedar base; base and stone […]

Jeremy Gomez (Taos Pueblo) has coaxed a tiny spirit bear out of beautifully wintry spiderweb alabaster. As a medicine bear fetish, he carries a bundle of feathers topped by a turquoise nugget. He’s balanced atop a red cedar base; both stone and base are oiled to preserve the materials. Bear stands 3-3/8″ long (excluding feather length) by 2-3/4″ […]

Spiderweb alabaster forms the body of this miniature ghost bear fetish by Jeremy Gomez (Taos Pueblo). He’s a medicine bear, carrying a bundle of feathers that mirror the colors of the stone topped by a tiny turquoise nugget. He stands atop a simple red cedar base; both cedar and stone have been oiled for protection. […]

This iconic belt buckle, a hallmark of traditional Southwestern Indian jewelry, is hand-wrought by an artist whose name the style bears. Rodney Concha (Taos Pueblo) is known for his beautifully complex belts and buckles in the classic design known as concha (the Spanish word for “shell). He has coaxed a large and highly stylized version from beautiful […]

Rodney Concha (Taos Pueblo) is known for his elaborate belts and buckles in a traditional style that bears his name: concha, for their shell-like shape. Here, he has created one out of glowing copper in a very old, very iconic shape and pattern, with a slightly-domed interior and scalloped and feathered edges. At its very […]

This classic Southwest Indian concha belt buckle takes form in the warm and healing hues of burnished copper. By Rodney Concha (Taos Pueblo), it bears his trademark Eye-of-Spirit-and-sunburst center, edged by scalloped stampwork that flares in the traditional eagle-feather pattern at either side. Buckle is 2-5/8″ long by 2″ high (dimensions approximate). Copper $125 + […]

This beautiful little medicine bear is carved in the bold, square style that is the hallmark of Taos Pueblo’s talented Gomez family — in this case, by Jeremy Gomez. Coaxed from orange alabaster in striated tones ranging from apricot to rose with an icy surface effect, he looks cool and warm simultaneously. He carries a […]

Frank Rain Leaf (Taos Pueblo) evokes an entire culturescape in this painting of the the Pueblo’s people and lands. It’s a timeless image, one that summons spirits long past yet thoroughly alive today. Frank’s meticulousness shows in his attention to historical detail, as seen in the men’s old-style braids and their blankets in classic striped […]

This strong young warrior of the Hoof Clan, Elk, has been coaxed out of the sandstone of his family’s mountain home by Randy Roughface (Ponca). His coat is the sunny golden shade of the sunrise, a beacon of warmth in the winter landscape, his rack of antlers so full and bold that they touch his back as he […]

This wild mustang by Randy Roughface (Ponca) evinces power, strength, and character. Coaxed from velvety Pilar slate in a rich and rare chocolate-brown shade, he appears to smile as, mane and tail flying behind him in the wind, he gathers himself to rear up on his hind legs. When placed on an entirely flat surface, he’s […]

Mike Schildt (Taos Pueblo) created this Bear Clan matriarch (and her three cubs) in 2013. Coaxed from one of the most spectacular examples of spiderweb alabaster we’ve ever seen, this Mother Ghost Bear is solid and substantial, and she stands on full alert. Snowy white with an incredibly rich brown spiderweb matrix, simultaneously delicate and […]

This adolescent Ghost Bear Cub is the eldest offspring in a family that arrived here in 2013, given form and being by Mike Schildt (Taos Pueblo). Carved of hauntingly beautiful spiderweb alabaster, soft white with a stunning spiderweb chocolate matrix. This responsible little elder brother looks on closely and carefully with bright blue eyes of […]

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